Hermann Hesse: What His Life Teaches Us

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There is a man who talks from my soul; as he feels the solitude so do I.

I can understand what he’d gotta fight through his childhood and always confronted with the questions which hardly could be answered. And how could a child to do so!

He is one of my favorite person on this planet.

A great article by a signora, what else. just enjoy reading 😊🧡🙏

Translated from Italian.

By  Sandra Saporito https://www.eticamente.net/author/sandra

via https://www.eticamente.net/

“I was a birth of nature launched towards the unknown, maybe towards something new or even towards nothing, leave it to develop from the deep, obey my destiny and do my own will, this was my task.”

Vita di Hermann Hesse
Hermann Hesse: Cosa Ci Insegna La Sua Vita

Di Sandra Saporito -14 Luglio 2019

Hermann Hesse, artist and Nobel Prize winner for literature, was born on July 2, 1877, in Germany, in a pietist family who gave him a very rigid education, where art did not have its place and was considered superficial.

Hermann Hesse wrote one day to his sister Adelaide: “It often happened that mom and dad expressed approval for a poem or a musical composition, adding however immediately that all this, of course, was only atmosphere, only empty beauty, only art, without ever to draw on a high value such as morality, will, character, etc. This theory ruined my existence and I detached myself from it with no possibility of return. “

This did not prevent him from becoming an artist, with a capital “A”, not so much because he was a writer, poet, aphorist and painter at the same time but because his art was rich in meanings that went far beyond the purely aesthetic aspect of the work: imbued with moral, philosophical and psychological meanings that exalted both the disturbances and the profound transformations with which his inner life was rich, some of his works, markedly influenced by his psychoanalytic sessions with CG Jung, described the inner journey to discovery of the Self and the mysteries of existence.

His works are rich in teachings but today I would like to talk to you about the life of this great writer and the lessons that his life has left us as a legacy.

Look for your identity, your vocation: it is what elevates the human being.

“THE REAL VOCATION OF EVERYONE IS ONE, THAT OF ARRIVING TO HIMSELF.”

Hermann Hesse developed a totally different vision of art from that of his parents, to the point of making it the pillar of his life. Although he had little hope that art could change society, he felt that it could profoundly change man.

“Art, the fulfillment of inner satisfaction, meant connecting with a profound and essential sense associated with the term” home “. But this house was not his parents’ house. It was rather a return to something intangible, tied to an intuition, but unique to each individual. It was a return and a journey at the same time and could only be achieved through art, or through the hard training of oneself. “Writes Barbara Spadini on the relationship between Hermann Hesse and art.

It was through this means repudiated by his family that Hermann Hesse developed a visceral desire to discover his identity and discover the mysteries of the world; which he did thanks to Jungian analytical psychology, the study of Buddhism, Hinduism and Gnosticism, art and philosophy.

Although he acted in stark contrast to his parents’ ideology, his family background had a great influence on him: he was aware of the influence his family tree had on his life.

He was in fact influenced by the life of his grandparents, whose name he bore: “To tell my story I have to start from the distant beginning. If it were possible for me, I would have to go back much further, to the very early years of my childhood, and even further into the distance of my origin. “

Art helps to become better human beings

Through his novels and poems, full of autobiographical elements, Hermann Hesse recalled the episodes of the past that had caused him pain by making writing an instrument of self-analysis, of reflection on the world and of inner evolution.

“I KNOW HOW MUCH INNER LIFE AND HOW MUCH RED BLOOD I LIVE EVERY SINGLE TO GENUINE MUST BE DRINKING, BEFORE I CAN STAND UP AND WALK ALONE.”

Its protagonists lived in the imagination what the author had experienced: fears about the future related to war and violence perpetrated on human beings in the name of ideologies of power, internal tensions related to religion and its prohibitions, existential questions on the meaning of life and the search for inner peace despite the inner evils that did not give him peace: he had suffered from years of depression.

The plot of his works often highlighted how much the individual and the collective were linked, the reflection on identity moved back and forth towards a collective dimension that in turn influenced the individual for better or worse, bringing him both to virtue and vice, with the awareness that life is made up of these two antagonistic forces.

The most beautiful works can arise from the crisis

“I WAS A BIRTH OF NATURE LAUNCHED TOWARDS THE UNKNOWN, MAYBE TOWARDS SOMETHING NEW OR EVEN TOWARDS NOTHING, LEAVE IT TO DEVELOP FROM THE DEEP, OBEY MY DESTINY AND DO MY OWN WILL, THIS WAS MY TASK.”

Through art and writing, in particular, Hermann Hesse gave voice to those inner storms that he managed to govern thanks to the movement of his feather: writing became a tool to express the hidden side of identity, art was transformed into a bridge between invisible and manifest that allowed to channel and sublimate the impulses of the unconscious: pain was transmuted into art thanks to ink.

In Demian, a training novel, written in 1919, Hermann Hesse wrote some passages of his conversations with Dr. Lang, collaborator of C. G. Jung with whom he made a psychoanalytic path to get out of a state of deep crisis. This path gave him the inspiration to write the novel: “But all [the conversations], even the most humble ones, hit the same point inside me with light and constant hammering, all contributed to form me, to break eggshells from everyone of which I raised my head a little higher, a little freer until the yellow bird with the beautiful head of a bird of prey erupted from the shattered shell of the world. “

This pained feather allowed him to develop a literary style that earned him a Nobel Prize in 1946 “For his inspired writing which in growing boldness and penetration exemplifies classical humanitarian ideals, and for the high quality of the style”.

In hindsight it is curious to note how much his works have influenced the minds of his readers, debunking his initial belief: art, in reality, changing men, can really help change society. A tree will certainly not be able to change the face of a forest but its fruits, trees in power, will certainly be able to do so with the passing of many seasons.

by Sandra “Eshewa” Saporito
Autrice e operatrice in discipline bio-naturali
www.risorsedellanima.it

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