Ptah, god of Egypt

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Who was Ptah? Ptah was the Memphis creator god of craftsmen, the earth and the Underworld. Ptah is depicted in a similar form to Osiris tightly wrapped like a mummy with green skin (the symbol of rebirth and regeneration). Ptah was also depicted holding the Staff of Dominion combining the Was Scepter (power), the Ankh (life) and the Djed (stability). His headdress was a blue cap crown. His titles: The “Lord of Truth”, the “Noble Djed”, the “First of the gods” and “He who set all the gods in their places and gave all things the breath of life”

It’s really fascinating to find more and more Gods in this magical land Egypt.

Discover the legends and myths and religious beliefs surrounding Ptah, the Egyptian creator god of craftsmen, the earth and the Underworld. His major cult center was at Memphis, he was the chief god of the Memphis Triad with his wife the lioness goddess Sekhmet and his son Nefertum. The priests of Memphis assimilated all aspects of the Osiris myth in favour of Ptah and the new Memphite Cosmogony (creation myth). The Memphis version of the creation myth existed alongside the Ennead of Heliopolis, but its followers believed that Ptah created Atum and the ocean from which he rose. Over time Ptah assumed the role of Osiris (hence their similarities in pictures) and credited with inventing the ‘opening of the mouth’ ceremony. http://www.landofpyramids.org/ptah.htm

Let another Stele talks about this amazing God; of course through the beautiful description by Marie Grillot Marie Grillot http://Marie Grillot

via https://egyptophile.blogspot.com/

The Nit-Ptah stele: a family on the march for eternity

Stele of Nit-Ptah – painted limestone – End of the Middle Kingdom
Discovered in Assassif (tomb R6, near tomb MMA 37), in 1915-1916
by the expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York led by Ambrose Lansing
Registered in the Journal of Entries of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo under number JE 45625

Four characters, a man, a woman, then again a man, a woman walk in the same direction, in perfect osmosis, in close “communion”. The movement is so well made that we imagine ourselves following this small procession. Even if there are some differences between the “two couples”, the impression of symmetry is striking.

The rhythm of this “procession” is also maintained by the contrast generated by the treatment of the colour of the flesh: that of the women is treated in a light yellow, almost white, while that of the men is an ocher-red.

This scene exudes great elegance as well as the feeling of being in a ‘world’ imbued with nobility and dignity.

Detail of the Nit-Ptah stele – painted limestone – End of the Middle Kingdom
Discovered in Assassif (tomb R6, near tomb MMA 37), in 1915-1916,
by the expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York led by Ambrose Lansing
Registered in the Journal of Entries of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo under number JE 45625

The first character (from the right) is Nit-Ptah (son of Ay); he is followed by his wife Seni; then come their son Antef and their daughter Djedou.

The head of the family, with black hair and short beard, is dressed in a simple white loincloth that reaches above the knee. It is adorned with a necklace with several rows, blue-turquoise, and a bracelet, the same colour, on each wrist. His left-hand carries, upright and straight, a stick that is almost his size, while in his right hand he holds horizontally what could be a cane, or a whip, which seems curved at one end. The areola of her breast, like that of the other characters, is materialized in black.

His wife Seni, “daughter of Tai”, follows him. Thin and slender, wearing a long three-part wig, she wears a beautiful long tight dress, held by two wide straps and leaving the chest exposed. This elegant outfit (in fishnet?) Uses a diamond pattern, available on three levels, respectively turquoise, red and black. A “dress background” is available in prints with red shades. The straps are turquoise in colour, as is the necklace and the large bracelets that adorn her wrists and ankles.

She may have paused for a few moments to breathe in the lotus flower she is holding in her left hand. The lotus which she encircles with the other hand is still in bud. In ancient Egypt, the lotus is highly symbolic; assimilated to rebirth, it is considered “the initial flower”, “the symbol of the birth of the divine star”. When the sun has finished its course, it takes refuge in the lotus to plunge back into the wave from which it will not emerge until the next morning … Thus, the cycle begins again every day, since the dawn of time … This gesture, marked with solemnity, is therefore highly important for the fate of the deceased.

Detail of the Nit-Ptah stele – painted limestone – End of the Middle Kingdom
Discovered in Assassif (tomb R6, near tomb MMA 37), in 1915-1916, by the expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York led by Ambrose Lansing
Registered in the Journal of Entries of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo under number JE 45625

Antef, the son, is the third character: if not the hairstyle, he looks like his father in every way. Djedou, their daughter, brings up the rear. She is, so to speak, “the portrait of her mother”. The only difference lies in her dress, which is plain, a very bright turquoise blue.

Detail of the Nit-Ptah stele – painted limestone – End of the Middle Kingdom
Discovered in Assassif (tomb R6, near tomb MMA 37), in 1915-1916
by the expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York led by Ambrose Lansing
Registered in the Journal of Entries of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo under number JE 45625

A few lines of hieroglyphics are inscribed in black above this touching family scene. They indicate in particular: “that the deceased and the members of his family benefit from the state of ‘imakhu’ (a term generally translated as ‘venerated, revered’) with the god Ptah-Sokaris, to whom they ask to intercede in order to that their ka can feed on ‘beer, (meat of) cattle and poultry’ “. (Rosanna Pirelli, “The Wonders of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo”).

This limestone stele, 23 cm high and 30 cm wide, is dated to the end of the Middle Kingdom. It was discovered, on the west bank of Louqsor, in Assassif, during the First World War, during excavations carried out in 1915-1916 by the expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York which had held the concession since the 1912-1913 season). The mission was then led by Ambrose Lansing with whom Harry Burton and Howard Carter were associated.

View of the Assassif plain at the foot of the temple of Hatshepsut in Deir el-Bahari

It is precisely at the foot of the temple of Hatshepsut: “to the left of the courtyard of the tomb MMA 37, that several small tombs were found, they were given the numbers R1 to R12”. Dated from the Middle Kingdom, they respect the funerary architecture.

The stele was in tomb R6. Mohamed Saleh and Hourig Sourouzian (Official Catalog Egyptian Museum of Cairo) who qualify it as: “Naive, conventional but attractive by its bright colours” provide these interesting details: “It was in one of the tombs of the ancient necropolis of ‘Assassif, which later found themselves covered or destroyed by the causeways of the temples of the XVIIIth Dynasty at Deir el-Bahari, and under the lower temple of Hatshepsut “.

It was registered in the Journal of Entries of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo under number JE 45625. In December 2015, when a small museum was opened in the transit hall of Terminal 3 of Cairo airport, it was there. exposed.

Marie Grillot

Sources :

Treasures of Egypt – The Wonders of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Francesco TiradrittiOfficial catalog Egyptian Museum of Cairo, Mohamed Saleh, Hourig Sourouzian, Verlag Philippe von Zabern, 1997The Treasures of Ancient Egypt at the Cairo Museum, National GeographicThe Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, May 1917 https://www.jstor.org/stable/3253911?seq=12#page_scan_tab_contents

The Civilization of Ancient Egypt, Delia Pembertonhttps://books.google.fr/books?id=TvRQmxWS6eYC&pg=PA34&lpg=PA34&dq=Nit%20Ptah&source=bl&ots=Fh17Zy7595&sig=lmjBF9dGF84eFaCSMxIT3iqljTQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF4cX-g9DOAhWjLcAKHe8mCPgQ6AEIPzAF#v=onepage&q=Nit%20Ptah&f=false
Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom, Adela Oppenheim, Dorothea Arnold, Dieter Arnold, Kei Yamamoto
https://books.google.fr/books?id=TvRQmxWS6eYC&pg=PA34&lpg=PA34&dq=Nit+Ptah&source=bl&ots=Fh17Zy7595&sig=lmjBF9dGF84eFaCSMxIT3iqljTQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF4cX-g9DOAhWjLcAKHe8mCPgQ6AEIPzAF#v=onepage&q=Nit%20Ptah&f=false
http://www.semataui.de/MR/12-01a-R6.htm
Ancient Egyptian Tombs: The Culture of Life and Death, Steven Snape
https://books.google.fr/books?id=re6izO_zAd4C&pg=PT54&lpg=PT54&dq=imakhu+ancient+egypt&source=bl&ots=cuVPrGtlor&sig=knc9YWJvnW6BRZrYOL6vCnj5LSQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjitnboNDOAhUD2BoKHVBFBGEQ6AEIMzAD#v=onepage&q=imakhu%20ancient%20egypt&f=false
http://mdw-ntr.com/blog/student-translations/171-stela-of-nitptah

Additional, interesting facts and information about ancient Egypt, and its mysterious gods is also available via: http://www.landofpyramids.org/ and http://www.landofpyramids.org/names-of-egyptian-gods.htm

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