Amor Fati

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As I try to take the benefit of my golden Saturday, minute by minute, let me show my deeply feeling for this fascinating complex of the soul; Fredric Nietzsche. Stunningly, I’m knowing him again and again as a Macho, about at the beginning to an opened minded man as new!

the first record;

And the second record;

I fell in love with the philosophy as I might once write, was a book which I’ve got in hand from my brother named; The History of the Philosophy. Plato’s Socrates Socrates · ‎Republic (Plato) was not new for me but there were some new ones: Spinoza Baruch Spinoza was my first love, and it went further with Schopenhauer  Arthur Schopenhauer , Nietzsche  Friedrich Nietzsche , Kant Kant , Russel ‎Bertrand Russell, Sartre Sartre  etc.

To put it bluntly, I think that philosophy is the door to open the dark side of the soul, to recognize the self, to think: Cogito ergo sum;;

And the last but not least;

Here is a nice animation to introduce him in another line; Acceptance! The Acceptance is not to give up! 🙂 ❤

An Animated Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Philosophical Recipe for Getting Over the Sources of Regret, Disappointment and Suffering in Our Lives

By http://www.openculture.com/ in Philosophy | January 16th, 2018

The idea of acceptance has found much, well… acceptance in our therapeutic culture, by way of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’ five stages of grief, 12-step programs, the wave of secular mindfulness practices, the body-acceptance movement, etc. All of these interventions into depressed, bereaved, guilt-ridden, and/or anxious states of mind have their own aims and methods, which sometimes overlap, sometimes do not. But what they all share, perhaps, for all the struggle involved, is a general sense of optimism about acceptance.

One cannot say this definitively about the Stoic idea of amor fati—the instruction to “love one’s fate”—though you might be persuaded to think otherwise if you google the term and come up with a couple dozen popularizations. Yes, there’s love in the name, but the fate we’re asked to embrace may just as well be painful and debilitating as pleasurable and uplifting. We cannot change what has happened to us, or much control what’s going to happen, so we might as well just get used to it, so to speak.

If this isn’t exactly optimism in the sense of “it gets better,” it isn’t entirely pessimism either. But it can become a grim and joyless fatalistic exercise. Yet, as Friedrich Nietzsche used the term—and he used it with much relish—amor fati means not only accepting loss, suffering, mistakes, addictions, appearances, or mental and emotional turbulence; it means accepting all of iteverything and everyone that causes both pain and pleasure, as Alain de Botton says above, “with strength and an all-embracing attitude that borders on a kind of enthusiastic affection.”

“I do not want to wage war against what is ugly,” he wrote in The Gay Science, “I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse.” Readers of Nietzsche may find themselves picking up any one of his books, including The Gay Science, to see him doing all of the above, constantly, on any random page. But his is never a systematic philosophy, but an expression of passion and attitude, inconsistent in its parts but, as a whole, surprisingly holistic. “My formula for greatness in a human being,” he writes in Ecce Homo, “is amor fati


That one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it… but love it.

Although the concept may remind us of Stoic philosophy, and is very often discussed in those terms, Nietzsche saw such thought—as he understood it—as gloomy, ascetic, and life-denying. His use of amor fati goes beyond mere resignation to something more radical, and very difficult for the human mind to stomach, to use a somewhat Nietzschean figure of speech. “It encompasses the whole of world history (including the most horrific episodes),” notes a Leiden University summary, “and Nietzsche’s own role in this history.” Above all, he desired, he wrote, to be a “Yes-sayer.”

Is amor fati a remedy for regret, dissatisfaction, the endlessly restless desire for social and self-improvement? Can it banish our agony over history’s nightmares and our personal records of failure? De Botton thinks so, but one never really knows with Nietzsche—his often satirical exaggerations can turn themselves inside out, becoming exactly the opposite of what we expect. Yet above all, what he always turns away from are absolute ideals; we should never take his amor fati as some kind of divine commandment. It works in dialectical relation to his more vigorous critical spirit, and should be applied with a situational and pragmatic eye. In this sense, amor fati can be seen as instrumental—a tool to bring us out of the paralysis of despair and condemnation and into an active realm, guided by a radically loving embrace of it all.


10 thoughts on “Amor Fati

  1. I really enjoyed this post Aladin! I love Nietzsche’s philosophy of “Amor Fati” the loving and accepting of one’s fate … saying “Yes”” to the whole of life … however difficult this would be for many!

    Great video, many thanks for sharing it. I sense when Carl Jung spoke of synchronicity there could be parallels with Nietzsche’s ideas here too. Warm autumnal blessings, Deborah.

    Liked by 2 people

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